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Scarpa Quantic – Comfortable, Versatile And Perfect For Real Rock

A few years ago, Scarpa recognized that a growing number of new climbers had graduated from entry-level climbing shoes but perhaps did not need the performance, specialization, and high price associated with top-level climbing footwear. In response, they introduced the wildly successful Arpia and, a few seasons later, the Veloce. Now, the new Quantic joins this group of reasonably priced shoes geared towards climbers seeking comfort and versatility without compromising performance.
  •  Scarpa Quantic

    Scarpa Quantic

It comes close to delivering the face-climbing performance found in top-tier shoes but without the top-tier price or foot-contorting fit.
Looking at the Quantic, you notice a few details that hint at the shoe's intended purpose and performance characteristics. First, it has a relatively flat profile with just a slight downturn suggesting it will be most at home on vertical to slightly overhanging terrain. And the use of Vibram's XS Edge rubber further confirms that the Quantic will excel on the small edges encountered when face climbing. Other less obvious performance-oriented details include an HT-Tension rand system with a Flexan midsole for added precision and control when standing on smaller footholds. On the back of the shoe, Scarpa employs its PAF System that spreads the force of the heel tension for increased comfort and increases the fit of the heel. The rest of the shoe is similarly well thought out with a vegan-friendly stretch-resistant synthetic upper for a consistent fit and a two Velcro-strap closure that easily accommodates a variety of foot shapes.
  •  Scarpa Quantic

    Scarpa Quantic

  •  Scarpa Quantic

    Scarpa Quantic

  •  Scarpa Quantic

    Scarpa Quantic

The Quantic confirmed its performance bias during testing – this shoe excels on vertical and slightly overhanging terrain on both plastic and the outdoors. In fact, it comes close to delivering the face-climbing performance found in top-tier shoes but without the top-tier price or foot-contorting fit. And depending on how tightly it's sized, the Quantic is a great and relatively comfortable option for cruising moderate multi-pitch classics. So does the Quantic have any shortcomings? Well, it may not be my first choice for the parkour-like shenanigans encountered on many new-school comp-style boulder problems (the softer Veloce is an excellent and reasonably priced option for that kind of climbing). Also, while the Quantic has a healthy swath of sticky rubber on the heel, the design is optimized for real-world climbing rather than the heel-hook-intensive party tricks frequently encountered in climbing gyms. Don't get me wrong, heel hooking with the Quantic is surprisingly secure; it just does not match the performance of more specialized (and more expensive) shoes.
  •  Scarpa Quantic

    Scarpa Quantic

  •  Scarpa Quantic

    Scarpa Quantic

  •  Scarpa Quantic

    Scarpa Quantic

So, who should be looking at the Quantic? If you're a climber seeking solid performance on real-world rock routes as well as vert and gently overhanging plastic, you need to check out the Quantic. It's an excellent intermediate shoe that punches above its fighting weight while remaining comfortable for longer routes. Use it as a versatile primary shoe, or grab a pair to complement your more plastic-specific footwear. You won't be disappointed.
You can find out more about the Scarpa Quantic and other great Scarpa products at www.scarpa.com.

Join the discussion of this and other climbing related stories at www.ontarioclimbing.com/forum/
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Gus Alexandropoulos is a freelance writer who has been involved in the outdoor industry for over 25 years. During his career he has been the editor at Canada’s national climbing magazine, as well as the gear editor for a national cycling magazine, triathlon magazine and running magazine. His work has been published in Canada’s national newspaper, The Globe and Mail, and he has been a guest on television and radio broadcasts. His passion for climbing began in Ontario in the mid 80s and he continues to travel extensively in search of crisp conditions and steep rock.